01 Thinking Visually

Public Service Announcement

SFU International Exchange Services (www.sfu.ca/studyabroad)

Thinking Visually

Andrew Hawryshkewich

Lecturer

Leila Aflatoony

TA

Sara Salevati

TA

Email Rules

What you must include

  1. Email requirements for response:
  2. Your full name
  3. The course number
  4. Your lab number
  5. Your student number
  6. A clearly articulated question

Lectures

What to expect

Photograph of doll standing in a classroom gazing off into the distance

Course Concepts

Solving Visual Communication

  1. Main concepts:
  2. Ideation
  3. Design
  4. Tools
  5. Critique

Close All Laptops Please

In future lectures, only the back half of the class may use their laptops.

Close all laptops please

WARNING: This is not a software course

We will provide an introductions to some software and resources for tutorials, but that is all.

Canvas

Your lovely neighbourhood learning system

Andrew opens Canvas now.

Assignments

Read the briefs

90% of assignment errors are because the instructions were not followed.

Readings

Quizzes

Final Exam

The final exam is a part take-home, part in-class exam. It will be completed over weeks 12/13 of the course.

Participation

Your participation grade will consist of "weeklies" which are introduced in lecture and finished before the next.

You Will Need

Grading

The SIAT grading scale

A+ > 95%
A > 90%
A- > 85%
B+ > 80%
B > 75%
B- > 70%
C+ > 65%
C > 60%
C- > 55%
D > 50%
F < 50%

WARNING: Regular participation is required for good grades

Questions?

Break-time!

You may take 10 minutes to partake in the natural wonders of SFU Burnaby.

Thinking Visually

Becoming Critical

Start looking at the world with a critical lens

A pair of cats with one sticking out its tongue

Understand Applications

Where can this become useful?

Marshal McLuhan

Media theorist

The Medium is the Message

(Insert yawn)

The Medium is the Figure

This is what you pay attention to

A glass of mint tea on a table

The Context is the Ground

This is the background; often the stuff you ignore

A blurry glass of mint tea on a table

Figure/Ground

Figure without ground becomes difficult to discern; ambiguous.

Three towers overlapping, making it difficult to discern which is in front

Intentional Figure/Ground

Visual communication is about being intentional and purposeful in our visual designs or messages.

Figure & Ground is Not Just Visual

Break-time!

You may take 10 minutes to stretch, consume the caffiene and, or, dance.

The McLuhan Medium

A medium is an extension of a human.

A cat staring at it's own image on a tablet

The Extension of Eyes

A camera extends our vision.

The McLuhan Probe

"The medium I employ is the probe, not the package."

A01: Images

With this project, we want you to probe the visual medium while focusing on a topic or opinion of your choosing.

Sharing Ideas

Figuring Out Figure/Ground

For the next 20 minutes go out and find examples of figure/ground relationships. Take photos, video, audio; anything that captures the separation. Post these examples to your preferred sharing location and post a link to this week's discussion board.

Critique

Step 1

Describe and discuss what you see.

A photograph of people walking across a windy field with some papers blowing away as a result Jeff Wall's A Sudden Gust of Wind (1993)

Critique

Step 2

A photograph of people walking across a windy field with some papers blowing away as a result Jeff Wall's A Sudden Gust of Wind (1993)

Critique

Step 3

Discuss and interpret the work's meaning. This should be based on the description and analysis.

A photograph of people walking across a windy field with some papers blowing away as a result Jeff Wall's A Sudden Gust of Wind (1993)

Critique

Step 4

Discuss the success of the work, and why. Be specific in the type of judgement you apply.

A photograph of people walking across a windy field with some papers blowing away as a result Jeff Wall's A Sudden Gust of Wind (1993)

Context (Ground)

How does it change things?

An old Japanese illustration of some people walking across a windy field with some papers blowing away as a result No. 35 of the series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (1832)

For next week

Please remember!

  1. Complete your 'participation' for this week
  2. Get started on Assignment 01
  3. Start looking at the world for inspiration
  4. Bring a camera to next week's lecture!

Next lecture is about starting your creative engines, and how "I'm not creative" is a lie.

How to Contact Andrew